Tag Archives: Colour

Top Five Sugar Skull Makeup Designs

maxresdefault

Sugar Skull Makeup by Lindsay Hancock 

At the beginning of the year, I explored a range of inspiring, black and white makeup designs featuring the human skull. The post featured my favourite design and I briefly discussed certain patterns or styles that I find particularly inspiring. Today I thought I would briefly analyse five different sugar skull makeup designs that I admire; this task has been rather challenging, as there are so many fantastic styles or designs online. Before we get started, I thought I would briefly mention the cultural associations related to the sugar skull face painting.

Since 2012, I developed a fascination for the Mexican Day of the Dead Festival including the sugar skulls that have significantly increased in popularity within contemporary art and popular culture. I decided to conduct some additional research online, where I discovered hundreds or even thousands of photographs featuring various sugar skull make up designs.

According to Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloe Sayar, these vibrant, hand crafted sugar skulls are designed for the Mexican Day of the Dead Celebration, an annual tradition featuring a range of activities, decorations and memorials that welcome the ‘departed souls.’1 The Day of the Dead is often celebrated on the 1st and the 2nd of November that reflects both European and Pre Hispanic traditions, as referenced by David Carrasco and Scott Sessions in The Daily Life of the Aztecs.2 I began to question the growing interest in the sugar skull makeup, why do we paint a skull onto our face? and why do we choose sugar skulls as the primary design?

Margo DeMello investigates certain activities and decorations that are prevalent within the Day of the Dead celebration including the skull face painting that, “one again, represent the dead symbolically.” According to DeMello, the Spanish were perturbed by the Aztec’s optimistic perceptions of death and “this is reflected in the skull imagery used by celebrants today, which universally feature smiling skulls.”3

This is their most distinctive quality, the sugar skulls are colourful, vibrant and creative; they provide a positive approach to death and the designs have deeply inspired various cultures from around the world. So here are my five favourite sugar skull makeup designs, enjoy!

fd11b9b544e073fdbd5723b9471a8ea0

#1 Black and White Sugar Skull: Blair Earcret and Amanda.A.Hughes

As soon as I conducted my research into the sugar skull makeup / face painting, I was instantly inspired by this particular design. Blair Eacret and Akins Hughes have created an inverted skull and the overall style is very unique compared to the other sugar skull patterns that I have discovered online.

This is one creative, yet intriguing design that immediately captured my attention and the artist(s) have successfully created a very interesting perspective in regards to the sugar skulls through the use of black and white makeup or face paint. There is limited information in regards to the process and I have struggled to search for a website or a social media page. This particular design would work really well as a professional photo shoot or a makeup tutorial!4

1069814_472861772854443_7725422254090869818_n

#2 Elvis Schmoulianoff: Vegan Makeup Artist

While I was searching through my Facebook news feed, I discovered a very admirable sugar skull design by Elivs Schmoulianoff, a professional makeup artist who sources “cruelty free cosmetics,” as referenced by the artist’s website.5

The dark lines or patterns significantly contrast with the bright, vibrant colours; these particular elements successfully create a very striking design. The yellow and the red just compliment each other perfectly and the dark outlines exemplifies the circular patterns around the eyes, chin and forehead. While the design is beautiful, the eyes or the pupils feature a sinister appearance, which provides a very unique composition.

dia-de-los-muertos-sugar-skull-catrina-makeup

#3 Sugar Skull Makeup Tutorial by Lindsay Hancock

This is one incredible, yet colourful sugar skull design by Lindsay Hancock who has created a very instructional video tutorial in regards to the overall style. Hancock is a professional makeup artist and stylist from Los Angeles with an extensive modelling portfolio, as referenced by Hancock’s website.6 As I continued to watch the sugar skull tutorial, I was amazed by the different tones, pigments and gradients; they definitely add a very interesting dimension. The final result is very impressive and the photo shoot presents a very shiny complexion that compliments the colourful sequins around the eye sockets and the wig.

This is properly the most colourful sugar skull I have encountered and the style does remind me of a Barbie doll or Nikki Minaj. In one of the photos, Hancock stands in front of a bright, purple backdrop covered in glitter, although the colours are very overpowering at times; In my personal opinion, the makeup does work really well against a white / silver backdrop. Overall the tutorial, the photo shoot and the final result features a very distinctive and eclectic representation of the Mexican sugar skulls.

screen-shot-2010-11-11-at-5-58-15-pm

#4 Sugar Skull Advertisement for Jose Cuervo

Now this particular design was a surprise discovery that caused me to stop everything completely! According to LEVINE/LEAVITT, the sugar skull make up is designed by Alex Box who has ‘collaborated’ with a very talented photographer, known as Dimitri Daniloff in order to create an advertising campaign for Jose Cuervo.7

The patterns and the gradients are very smooth / refined and the elements contrast with the monochromatic colours and the dark backdrop. There are shadows along the model’s cheekbones that definitely adds definition to the design, the actual shape appears relatively similar to the human skull. This is a very fascinating campaign that has inspired me to try the tequila for myself.

sug3-1

# Royal Sugar Skull Tutorial by Jangsara

Last by not least, I present a very informative, yet interesting sugar skull tutorial by Jangsara. The site presents a list of instructions in regards to the shading, the definition and the decorations. The design is minimal compared the other styles that I have researched, although the shading around the cheekbones does remind me of the human skull. The actual shape appears similar to the skull, although the sequins do add a decorative element to the design.

While I do admire the sugar skull makeup, the roses are quite distracting and a simple, dark background would elevate the overall design. If the roses were smaller, they properly wouldn’t interfere with the main focal point. Overall the tutorial and the final result is very inspiring, creative and compelling.8

Overall, these are my favourite sugar skull makeup styles and the decision was incredibly challenging, as there are so many impressive designs to choose from. I’ll intend to create an additional post with all the sugar skull designs that I have recently discovered over the past few weeks. It would be interesting to research some male sugar skull designs as well in order to create some variation. I hope you enjoy the post and stay tuned for further updates.

References 

1.Carmichael, Elizabeth and Sayar, Chloe, The Skeleton at the Feast: The Day of the Dead in Mexico, (Texas: Texas Press Printing, 2003) p.6
2.Carrasco, David and Sessions, Scott, The Daily Life of the Aztecs, (California: ABC-CLIO, 2011) p.249
3.DeMello, Margo, Faces around the World: A Cultural Encyclopedia of the Human Face, (California ABC – CLIO, LLC, 2012), p. 58-60.
4.MuchPics, (Accessed 12/2/15) http://goo.gl/NmNW3J
5.Elvis Schmoulianoff: Make Up, Wigs and Body Art, ‘About,’ (Accessed 12/2/15) http://goo.gl/pifYhI
6.Lindsay Hancock, YouTube, “Sugar Skull Makeup Tutorial,” 31 Oct 2012 (Accessed 12/2/15) http://goo.gl/4pBjgG
7.LEVINE/LEAVITT, “Jose Cuervo by Dimitri Daniloff,” Nov 12, 2010 (Accessed 12/2/15) http://goo.gl/CM3gJC
8.Jangsara, “Tutorial: Royal Sugar Skull,” Sept 16, 2011 (Accessed 12/2/15) http://goo.gl/Zd9qcP


The Works of Lora Zombie Present Vibrant Colours, Inspiring Designs and Skulls

10271368_632305103520767_5531453575065940398_o

Girls Loves Skulls – Lora Zombie

Over the past couple of weeks, I have been particularly interested in Lora Zombie, a painter / illustrator from Russia who has created a series of colourful, eclectic designs that are combined with influential icons and pop culture references. At first I was amazed by the artist’s intricate style including the high level of detail or craftsmanship as well as the dripping paint that oozes towards the bottom of each individual painting / illustration.

According to Lora Zombie’s official website, the artist is internationally renowned through various social media platforms, blogs and exhibitions within Russia and the United States. I decided to search through Lora Zombie’s inspiring online portfolio and I have recently discovered that the skull is a popular symbol within the artist’s work.

Zombie’s illustrations are often categorised as ‘grunge art,’ however there is limited information in regards to this particular style, this is definitely something I’ll have to research later down the track; from a personal perspective, Lora Zombie’s work features a similar appearance to graffiti art.

puppies_and_skulls_by_lora_zombie-d62pt91

Puppies and Skulls – Lora Zombie

‘Girls Loves Skulls’ for instance features a young girl embracing a large multicoloured skull within the centre of the image. This is one of my favourite illustrations by Lora Zombie; the combination of vibrant colours and paint splatters create a remarkable, yet dynamic style that successfully delivers a playful, optimistic approach towards death and the human skull, this is just my personal point of view anyway.

The visual aesthetics provide a level of curiosity and fascination; the skull in particular becomes a significant focal point that instantly attracts the viewer’s attention. The bold, vibrant colours compliment the contour of the skull as well as the young girl on the left hand side; her plain white dress along with her black, knee-length socks provides a dramatic composition with the other elements within the image.

10570318_707294212688522_961056709675346111_n

Pugs and Skulls – Lora Zombie

The young girl appears to be rather excited or pleased to be holding this multicoloured skull that features a rather concerned expression. The refined detail definitely provides the subjects with a unique personality that are emphasised through the loud, vibrant colours as well as the harsh brush strokes.

There is another work in particular that has captured my attention; Lora Zombie’s ‘Puppies and Skulls’ is colourful, playful and absolutely gorgeous! The name summarises the work pretty well, this illustration features at least three colourful skulls that are surrounded by a range of adorable puppies, this is such a cute, yet artistic combination.

‘Pugs and Skulls’ also features a similar style and aesthetic; the work features a pile of small multicoloured skulls that are integrated with a crowd of energetic puppies, this is just too adorable! I could honestly write about the artist’s work for hours, as I thoroughly enjoy the humorous, yet comical twist within these imaginative designs. Overall, Lora Zombie’s work delivers a high level of creativity and innovation that is combined with a lively, yet vivacious characteristic.

If you would like to view Lora Zombie’s portfolio or website, just click on the links below.

References

http://lorazombie.com/

https://www.facebook.com/LoraZombie (Images from Facebook)

http://lora-zombie.tumblr.com/

http://instagram.com/lorazombie

https://www.threadless.com/made/lora-zombie


Mickael Alacoque’s Sculptural Works present a Playful, Colourful and Eccentric Aesthetic.

308481_10150312950478676_534128804_n

 Prince Charming, Mickael Alacoque, 2008

Just a few moments ago, I discovered quite an unusual body of work by Mickael Alacoque, an artist / sculptor based in the United Kingdom who has created a series of sculptures that feature a bizarre, yet distinctive visual aesthetic. Alacoque’s ‘Bad Babysitters’ features a range of three-dimensional works that successfully combine three individual components including a human skull, two melting ice-cream cones and the body of a small canine, as referenced by Skullspiration. 1

I remember feeling that overwhelming sense of bewilderment as I continued to stare at this pink, fluorescent statue with the two ice-cream cones protruding from the forehead of the skull. Alacoque’s Prince Charming features quite an obscure appearance, although the work features a high level of detail and intricacy that is combined with an element of spontaneity.

302061_10150312949093676_2025604837_n

Etruria and Florence, Alacoque, 2010

This particular work motivated me to undertake some further research into the artist’s own influences or inspirations. A Gallery presents an interesting statement by Alacoque who explains his previous training or expertise within “figurative sculpture and mould making,” as well as his interest in public monuments. The artist explores these traditional techniques within an artistic, contemporary context through the use of vibrant colours and iconic symbols. 2

Alacoque obscures the way the ‘public statue’ is interpreted or examined within society and the sculptural works present quite a unique, imaginative style through the use of bright, fluorescent colours and textures. The melting ice-cream cones, the grimacing skull and the canine’s body feature a refined, yet detailed structure that are combined in order to create a completely different meaning or interpretation all together.

308221_10150312950128676_487033537_n

Alacoque, Mitty, 2008

In regards to Alacoque’s statement from AGallery, “Gnome Kone and Bad Babysitter are part of a series of sculptures that are concerned with a playfully sinister bastardization of familiar objects.” 3

These sculptures in particular are often described as unsettling when they are viewed up close, however I don’t necessarily find them disturbing, in fact I find the Bad Babysitter series rather amusing or entertaining. From a personal perspective, the compositional elements present a playful, humorous and satirical disposition that successfully provide quite a memorable impression.

If you are interested in Alacoque’s eccentric works, I would recommend visiting the links listed below for further details.

References

1. Skullspiration, “Skull Sculptures by Mikael Alacoque,” http://www.skullspiration.com/skull-sculptures-by-mikael-alacoque/

2. Mikael Alacoque, Artist’s Statement, A Gallery, http://www.agallery.co.uk/gallery/mikael_alacoque.php

3. Alacoque, Artist’s Statement, A Gallery

Other References

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mikael-Alacoque/31318213675  (Images are sourced from Facebook Page)

https://twitter.com/MikaelAlacoque


Bright, Colourful and Intricate Skulls by Marie-Pascale Gautheron

1354534-7

While I was browsing through the internet, I discovered the works of Marie-Pascale Gautheron, a contemporary artist based in Paris who creates a series of hand crafted skulls with delicate, vibrant and intricate designs. Every minuscule detail is highlighted through a combination of bold colours or decorative patterns that compliments the shape and the contour of the skull.

These sculptural works in particular reminded me of the Mexican Day of the Dead Celebration and the sugar skulls, however these quirky designs feature a unique, psychedelic twist. In regards to the Skull Appreciation Society, Gautheron uses the skull as a visual art form that are either drawn or hand painted and I was immediately intrigued by the high level of craftsmanship.

tumblr_ncizv1iDVP1qjyasqo3_1280

As I continued to browse through Gautheron’s online portfolio, I discovered a series of neon skulls and the paint successfully creates a very interesting, yet surreal effect. I decided to ask Gautheron about these delicate neon skulls and the artist explained that the works feature a “special paint that reacts to light.” This is definitely a fascinating method / process that instantly invites the viewer to take a closer look at the works.

These skulls in particular are quite different to anything I have seen before and Gautheron uses the skull frequently throughout her work in order to create a series of decorative and artistic murals. From a personal perspective, these eclectic skulls portray the concept of death and mortality in a positive, cheerful manner through the combination of vibrant colours and innovative designs.

tumblr_n7jceoI69W1rhfl7ko1_400

There is another sculptural project that immediately captured my attention, Gautheron has constructed a skull from paper that features a highly detailed, realistic aesthetic; the work itself delivers so many different interpretations that successfully invites the audience to view the skull from another angle or perspective.

The skull features a drawing of an octopus holding a skull with its tentacles; this is rather interesting as the skull features a smaller image of a skull. This is quite a clever concept / idea and Gautheron’s work delivers a surreal, yet fascinating experience.

927138_1477120059202793_735400633_n

If you are interested in skulls or contemporary art, I would highly recommend visiting the artist’s website, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram page. The Skull Appreciation Society also features a very interesting article in regards to the works of Marie-Pascale Gautheron that is definitely worth viewing!

References

http://mpgautheron.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mpgautheron

http://instagram.com/mpgautheron

https://twitter.com/mpgautheron

The Skull Appreciation Society, September 22nd 2014, Marie – Pascale Gautheron http://skullappreciationsociety.com/marie-pascale-gautheron/

Saatchi Art, Marie-Pascale Gautheron, 2014, http://www.saatchiart.com/mpgautheron

Illustrated Monthly, Marie-Pascale Gautheron, http://illustratedmonthly.tumblr.com/post/97929098769/rad-skull-art-by-marie-pascale-gautheron


Skullavera showcases unique ceramic skulls at Melbourne’s Day of the Dead Festival

DSC_0529
All the skulls in the photographs are produced by Skullavera

Last Saturday, I attended a Day of the Dead Celebration in Melbourne that featured a range of hand crafted skulls, printed t-shirts, altars, traditional Aztec dancing, Mexican street food and face painting! The event was located at the Trust Bar and Restaurant in Flinders street that was full of visitors with their faces painted as the Mexican sugar skulls, it was fascinating as there were so many different patterns and designs!

It was interesting to see how each person had interpreted the Mexican sugar skulls, some had used colourful face paint while others had decided to go with a  minimalist approach. Furthermore, I did find the event particularly fascinating as I have never been to a Day of the Dead festival in Melbourne and the event was quite different to what I was expecting! At first the venue was rather crowded, although I throughly enjoyed watching visitors passing by with their sugar skull face paint!

DSC_0535-2

As I was walking through the venue, there was one stall that had captured my attention. There were a range of colourful and illustrative skulls that were displayed onto a wooden surface along with a selection of skeletal figurines including Frida Kahlo and Marlyin Monroe. These hand crafted skulls featured elaborate and decorative designs that are quite unique compared to the other ceramic skulls that I have seen throughout the city of Melbourne.

These incredible hand crafted skulls are produced by a company known as Skullavera that is currently based in Sydney, Australia. BME Melbourne have conducted an interview with the artist who explains that the skulls are inspired by Chicano / latino tattoo designs as well as “the Mexican Drug Cartels.” 1 Each skull features a completely different style, there were so many different patterns, designs and illustrations, in fact the stall at the Day of the Dead celebration was definitely vibrant and decorative.

DSC_0547

In a way, the artist applies a unique and distinctive style to the ceramic skulls, the level of detail and craftsmanship is incredible! The illustrations provides each skull with a unique characteristic, these models appear to have an individual personality, a personal style!

While there were bright and colourful designs available, there were other skulls that featured a range of black and while illustrations, the stall at the Day of the Dead Celebration in Melbourne featured some extraordinary ceramic skulls in all different shapes and sizes, I was seriously tempted to buy one for myself!

The official Skullavera blog does mention that the hand crafted skulls are inspired by the Day of the Dead celebration; from a personal perspective the ceramic skulls do feature both Mexican and European influences, there are various designs that do remind me of Western popular culture. 2 The way the skulls were displayed do feature similarities to a traditional Mexican altar that is usually installed during the Day of the Dead in order to welcome spirits to the celebration, as referenced by Maria Herrera Sobek. 3

DSC_0544

In fact the display in general was creative and inspiring, it was seriously hard to walk past the stall without taking a dozen photos, I was in awe for at least 30 minutes, I just could not take my eyes off these hand crafted skulls! I f you haven’t seen Skullavera’s work, then I would strongly suggest to visit the Facebook page or the blog, there is some incredible work displayed online.

For those who have never even heard of this Day of the Dead Celebration in Melbourne, I would recommend buying a ticket for next year! As if you can go wrong with beer, tequila, nachos and ceramic skulls all in the same venue? While the event itself was crowded to begin with, the works on display were definitely worth seeing!

1. BME Melbourne, “Skullavera Interview”, June 28th 2013, http://www.bmemelbourne.com/bmeinterviews/skullavera-interview/ (accessed 5/11/13)
2.  Skullavera Official Blog, http://skullavera.blogspot.com.au/ (accessed 5/11/13)
3. Sobek, Maria Herrera (ed) “Altars” in Celebrating Latino Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Cultural Traditions, Volume 1 (California: ABC – CLIO, 2012) http://books.google.com.au/books?id=bDIwZ8BieWcC&pg=PA423&dq=traditional+mexican+altars+
celebration+latino+folklore&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6hR6UpbuJMO2kgWqh
4GwCg&ved=0CDA
Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=traditional%20mexican%20altars%20
celebration%20latino%
20folklore&f=false

Other References:

https://www.facebook.com/Skullavera73

http://skullavera.bigcartel.com/

http://www.dotdfestival.com.au/


Two New Beaded Skulls from Mexico

DSC_0204-2

Photography by Charlotte Pridding, 2013

On the day of my birthday, I received two small gifts from an authentic day of the dead store in Melbourne called Amor Y Locura. On the 22nd of September, I received two beaded skulls that feature intricate patterns and designs, the skulls were imported from Mexico and there were only two left in Australia, how how lucky is that?!

While visiting the Day of the Dead store in Melbourne, I was amazed by the two large beaded skulls on the very bottom shelf, the level of craftsmanship is remarkable! A customer within the store had advised me that these colourful beaded ornaments are also known as the huichol skull, I must admit I was intrigued by the name so I decided to undertake some online research.

DSC_0169

According to Lynne Bairstow, Huichol Art derives from many ancient traditions and rituals that were commonly practised amongst the aztecs. Bairstow explains that the patterns and the designs found in Huichol Art represent nature, these beaded sculptures often contain a strong association to various animals and plants.

In comparison Harald Prins and Dana Walrath in Cultural Anthroplogy: The Human Challenge also comment on the extraordinary designs found within Huichol art that also refer to the values and beliefs practised amongst the indigenous communities within Mexico. Prins and Walrath refer to Schaeffer & Furst in People of the Peyote : Huichol Indian History, Religion and Survival, both authors explain that these particular designs refer to a “sacred plant” in Mexico also known as the “peyote”.

DSC_0191

The indigenous communities in Mexico also associated this particular plant with a deer that would deliver important messages to many of the “gods and goddesses”. It’s quite fascinating to actually discover that all of these designs have such a strong meaning / signification; these beaded sculptures certainly reflect Mexico’s cultural and spiritual heritage!

So what else did I discover? Well, I also discovered the works of Catherine Martin who was also inspired by Huichol art during her trip to Mexico, Martin has also spoken directly to some of the tribes who create these exquisite sculptures. According to LN-CC, Martin collaborates with these ancient tribes in order to produce colourful, vibrant and remarkable designs! This is a very unique idea as I’ve never really seen too many artists or designers appropriate the Huichol beaded sculptures, in fact I’ve never even heard of Huichol art until I visited the Day of the Dead store in Melbourne.

DSC_0181

I decided to take some photographs of the beaded skulls out in the backyard; I do find the patterns and designs particularly fascinating! The beads create a gradient around the eye sockets, the nose and the mouth, this also creates quite an interesting effect. Some of the patterns do resemble plants, animals and even flames that are located around the edge of the skull.

In a way the patterns remind me of an abstract landscape painting as strange as it sounds! The skull to the right has green along the bottom and the blue around the eye sockets reminds me of a river streaming along a field or a mountain; on the other hand, the white, orange and yellow remind me of a rising sunset. I suppose there would be various meanings and interpretations in relation to the beaded skulls, I must admit these sculptures do appear bright and colourful in the front living room, in fact they make fantastic ornaments for the house!

DSC_0198

So if you haven’t seen one of these beaded skulls before, I would definitely recommend visiting Amor Y Locura in Melbourne, Fitzory. It’s definitely worth the visit, especially if you would like to see these exquisite Huichol Skulls in the flesh!

References

Schaeffer. S.B & Furst P.T, People of the Peyote: Huichol Indian History, Religion and Survival in Harold Prins and Diane Walrath’s,
Cultural Anthropology  : The Human Experience (California: Thomson Higher Education, 2008 – 2005, http://books.google.com.au/booksid=8WMGAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA331&dq=huichol+beaded

+art&hl=en&sa=X&ei=tf1LUpPqCIa3kAWF8oDgDg&ved=0CEYQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=
huichol%20beaded%20art&f=false

Baird, David & Bairstow, Lynne, Frommer’s Mexico (New Jersey: Wiley Publishing Inc, 2006) 
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=th1ehvI1hrwC&pg=PA303&dq=huichol+beaded+art&hl=
en&sa=X&ei=pk9RUrK3BqiZiQfaw4H4C

w&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=huichol%20beaded%20art&f=false

LN-CC, Interview with Catherine Martin, LN-CC, undated (accessed 4/10/13) 
http://www.ln-cc.com/en/restofworld/mens/interview-with-catherine-martin-our-exquisite-corpse/page/catherine-martin-int

http://www.ourexquisitecorpse.com/


Andrea Benge

everybody_wears_a_crown_by_babydollb-d5nomxd

Everybody Wears a Crown – Andrea Benge

Amazing Skull Paintings by Andrea Benge

While I was browsing through the internet, I discovered the works of Andrea Benge, a contemporary artist who works with watercolour and coloured pencil. I have noticed quite a lot of skulls within Benge’s work and the colourful illustrations adds a stylised aesthetic that I do find visually interesting.

The style and the subject matter within Benge’s paintings also reminds me of tattoo art; in fact these particular artworks would make amazing tattoo designs! These paintings are very similar to the  designs I have seen displayed within the tattoo parlours across the city.

In “Everybody Wears a Crown”, Benge has juxtaposed the skull wearing a multicoloured crown along with colourful paint strokes and paint splatters that adds a very interesting effect to the overall image. In a way Benge has combined beauty with morbidity through the artist’s technique; the paint strokes deliver a vibrant and decorative appearance that contrasts with the grimacing skull within the very centre of the artwork.

the_depth_of_grief_by_babydollb-d5ny319

In Depth of Grief – Andrea Benge

What fascinates me about this particular artwork is the paint that seeps from the eye sockets; in a way the skull appears to be crying and the paint distorts the original context or symbolic meaning behind the skull.

“The Depth of Grief” is another painting by Benge that features decorative patterns and swirls on the forehead of the skull that is juxtaposed with a blue rose; the designs are very similar to the colourful hand crafted skulls from the Mexican Day of the Dead Celebration. During the festival, celebrants decorate wooden, ceramic and papier mache skulls that establish a reunion between the living and the deceased.

The painting also reminds me of the Momento Mori, a 15th century art style that confronted a person with their own mortality. The skull was often juxtaposed with clocks, hour glasses and other still life objects; in a way Benge’s work is a contemporary version of the Momento Mori!

These two particular artworks are my favourite from Benge’s collection, they’re bight, they’re colourful and they have skulls, what more could you ask for!

For more information please click on the link below.

http://www.andreabenge.com/

http://babydollb.deviantart.com/